Edmund Wait (b. 1798) by Alethea Warren Shaw (1888-1978)

 

The preface to Edmund Wait's pamphlet reads: "Being now aged and the only surviving member of the old Wait family of Swanton, Vt. I am urged to compile their record, with some incidents of my childhood and subsequent history. I know of no record of my Grandfather's name, but of statements made to me some thirty years hence, by Judge Waite, of Isle LaMonte and Nathaniel Wait, a particular and intelligent old man of Fairfield, Vt. I am fully satisfied that my Grandfather was nearly related to them as they said. Their separate accounts fully harmonized, and in the absence of other records, proved that we, the Waits of New England, originated in one common parentage of English blood on the father's side and Welch on the mother's side. If this is established, we find our genealogy in the Wait Record now being compiled, with great care and expense by Henry E. Wait of West Newton, Mass. which traces back to A.D. 1?75. (she had typed 1975, which obviously is not correct)

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Edmond Wait b.1798 in Highgate, Franklin, VT
m. Hannah Wilson

 

As it turned out, Henry E. Wait found that our line did not connect over here with his line, but fortunately he saved all the Wait letters he had received from various Waits which did not connect and some years later gave them all to John Cassan Wait who was compiling our branch of the Wait family. A copy of Henry E. Wait's book will be found in the Boston, Mass. Library.

John C. Wait was a student at Cornell Univ. at Ithaca, NY where Prof. Lucien Wait was Math Professor. Prof. Wait encouraged John C. Wait to start collecting the data of our branch of Waits, and said he would help finance the work. But he died before the work was completed, and J.C. Wait, now a lawyer in NYC had to give up the idea of printing a more complete book of his findings. He left his early paper covered book and a copy of his further manuscripts to both the Cornell Library and the NYC Library. I copied a lot of his manuscript notes about the early British Waits, and also the corrections which should be made to his book, and gave them to interested Julia Green, of Wilmette, Ill. in 1974.

Edmund Wait wrote for children under the following titles -- "The Little Girl and Her Chickens"; "Early Economy"; "Early Perseverance"; "The Bear"; "How the Man Killed the Lynx"; "Mr. Hungerford"; "The Boy Who Saved His Money". The final essay was entitled "Family Government", excerpts from that are copied above.

Edmund wrote about smuggling in his little book, "We had some Tories and they would smuggle. Some sold potash and cattle to the smugglers and then complained about the smugglers. D.P. Van Ness was at the head of the Custom House Dept. He lived in Burlington (VT), I think. Three men named Dean, Olmspby, and Mudget found and rigged up an old boat near the mouth of Onion River. They fixed on it an old gun barrel, calling it a cannon. They loaded it to kill. They were out dodging about on the lake, supposed to be smugglers. The deputies were soon on the track and when they came in range, the smugglers fired off their "cannon" killing one of the officers. They were immediately arrested and had their trial in Burlington and Dean was hung. There was one man shot in Franklin, supposed to be a smuggler. Capt. Hopkins and Dr. Penniman watched at Swanton. Dr. Penniman took upon himself to be Corporal of the guard one night there. In going the rounds, he found a soldier asleep on his post, leaning against a stump. The doctor was quite severe on him for getting asleep. The man modestly replied, 'I was not asleep, you honor, I was listening to the frogs'. 'What do they say?' asked the Doctor. 'One says, who smuggles? Another says, All that can! Another says, Pennaman too, Pennaman too!'

As it turned out, Henry E. Wait found that our line did not connect over here with his line, but fortunately he saved all the Wait letters he had received from various Waits which did not connect and some years later gave them all to John Cassan Wait who was compiling our branch of the Wait family. A copy of Henry E. Wait's book will be found in the Boston, Mass. Library.

John C. Wait was a student at Cornell Univ. at Ithaca, NY where Prof. Lucien Wait was Math Professor. Prof. Wait encouraged John C. Wait to start collecting the data of our branch of Waits, and said he would help finance the work. But he died before the work was completed, and J.C. Wait, now a lawyer in NYC had to give up the idea of printing a more complete book of his findings. He left his early paper covered book and a copy of his further manuscripts to both the Cornell Library and the NYC Library. I copied a lot of his manuscript notes about the early British Waits, and also the corrections which should be made to his book, and gave them to interested Julia Green, of Wilmette, Ill. in 1974.

Edmund Wait wrote for children under the following titles -- "The Little Girl and Her Chickens"; "Early Economy"; "Early Perseverance"; "The Bear"; "How the Man Killed the Lynx"; "Mr. Hungerford"; "The Boy Who Saved His Money". The final essay was entitled "Family Government", excerpts from that are copied above.

Edmund wrote about smuggling in his little book, "We had some Tories and they would smuggle. Some sold potash and cattle to the smugglers and then complained about the smugglers. D.P. Van Ness was at the head of the Custom House Dept. He lived in Burlington (VT), I think. Three men named Dean, Olmspby, and Mudget found and rigged up an old boat near the mouth of Onion River. They fixed on it an old gun barrel, calling it a cannon. They loaded it to kill. They were out dodging about on the lake, supposed to be smugglers. The deputies were soon on the track and when they came in range, the smugglers fired off their "cannon" killing one of the officers. They were immediately arrested and had their trial in Burlington and Dean was hung. There was one man shot in Franklin, supposed to be a smuggler. Capt. Hopkins and Dr. Penniman watched at Swanton. Dr. Penniman took upon himself to be Corporal of the guard one night there. In going the rounds, he found a soldier asleep on his post, leaning against a stump. The doctor was quite severe on him for getting asleep. The man modestly replied, 'I was not asleep, you honor, I was listening to the frogs'. 'What do they say?' asked the Doctor. 'One says, who smuggles? Another says, All that can! Another says, Pennaman too, Pennaman too!'

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